Tag Archives: Leadership

Time flies when you’re learning – 2 years as CEO

2 years ago I took on the role as Redington’s CEO (5th April 2016).

It has been the hardest job I’ve ever done and yet the most fulfilling one.

I’m so proud of what we have achieved together over that time – from the great feedback we get from clients on the outcomes our team continue to deliver for them, to getting into Sunday Times Top 100 Best Small Companies, to licencing our software for the first time in order to solve a client need, to the important work we are doing with the Chinese insurance industry, to RedSTART becoming a charity, to running 2 successful returnship programs, etc.

As I told Liam Kennedy at IPE a couple of weeks ago,

“Whilst we are ambitious to make 100m people financially secure, by growing our core business as well as pivoting into new business lines and geographies, we remain crystal clear that we will not comprise on quality of service we offer our clients nor on our culture.

We’d rather be a small giant. We don’t want to become a big foot. Otherwise, there’s a real risk of getting bigger and bigger but delivering less and less quality advice to many more pension funds.
That isn’t acceptable to us.”

You can read the full article here – https://www.ipe.com/investment/strategically-speaking/strategically-speaking-redington/10023914.article

I’m taking some time right now to pause, reflect, and reset. It’s interesting to look back on my reflections at the end of day 1 (http://www.miteshsheth.com/ceo-day-1/) as well as the key risk indicators (a CEO red radar) that I outlined this time last year (http://www.miteshsheth.com/how-to-stop-your-ceo-from-screwing-up/).

Some of my biggest lessons from this year include:

  • Being more realistic about how long things take and having patience.
  • Getting the right balance between internal and external, empowering and dictating, big picture and the details.
  • Creating more structure and role clarity.
  • Seeking out and really listening to challenging viewpoints without feeling defensive.
  • Looking after myself, my mental health and energy.

I’ll share further reflections in a couple of weeks time.

I want to thank Rob and Dawid for believing in me, supporting me and challenging me over the past 2 years. This was no easy thing to do for them and they have maintained the right balance of being involved, giving me space and checking in where needed.

Also, the Senior Leaders that stand by my side without whom I would not have been able to achieve a fraction of what we have over the past couple of years. I am grateful for their challenge, contribution and friendship.

I continue to believe that the essence of this role is to serve the incredible people who work at Redington. It is important that they continue to hold me and the other leaders accountable by giving us regular challenge and feedback.

Finally, my incredible wife, who has been my strength through ups and downs, giving me advice, helping me manage my emotions, keeping my ego in check and making sure I look after myself.  Thank you for your patience, guidance and unconditional love.

It’s a privilege to serve this firm and to work with such generous people. I’m delighted to still be learning and growing so much.

Goodbye 2017, thank you for the lessons…

For a New Year’s resolution to stick, I have found:

  1. it needs to be meaningful (you have to visualise it clearly and really care about the outcome);
  2. you have to be able to take small realistic steps every day (so you feel like you’re making progress);
  3. you have to enjoy the process and frame it positively (the brain avoids negative/painful things);
  4. you need a back-up plan to get on track again every time you slip (because you will slip); and
  5. you need to share it with others around you to motivate you and keep you accountable.

I have really benefited from making a public New Year’s Resolution each year since 2013. I also have valued the clarity of having decided what the single most important thing is the start of the year. One improvement I’d like to make to this is to review what is the single most important thing I want get done each day, including weekends and holidays, not just centered around work goals.

The past 5 years has been the most incredible period of growth, learning and change for me. Whilst I haven’t always achieved my goals each year, I find the process of reflection invaluable. I am still working on all the resolutions from the past 5 years, whilst building on them as I go along (discovery (2013), focus (2014), sacrifice (2015), vulnerability (2016) and balance (2017)). I’ve enjoyed going back and reading my thoughts from the previous year/years to be able to see where I have moved forward and where I’m still struggling.

2017 in review

At the start of 2017 I said that “my overarching focus was going to be to experiment with daily hacks, habits, systems, routines and overrides that will help me give time and attention to my family, my health and all the things at work and outside of work that are most important in the long term”.

Having had an incredibly fulfilling and challenging year at work, I wanted to invest wholeheartedly in other important areas of my life (that were at risk of being neglected) including: Marriage, Children, Health, Family, Friendships, Charity, Learning and Spirituality.

I had defined what success would look like “at the end of the year, I want to be able to look back and know that I tried to invest passionately in each important area of my life. Whenever I fail to get it right, as no doubt I frequently will, I need to analyse, review, iterate, adapt and try again…”.

When I honestly ask myself how I’ve done against this definition of success, I have to admit defeat.

I cannot look back and say I invested in each area of life in 2017. Work was my overarching focus, effort and attention.

It’s ok. I don’t need to dress it up, or make excuses.

It wasn’t just me but a lot of my senior team also struggled with balance this year.

So, what can I learn from this failure?

I work with really smart and interesting people, together we are doing meaningful work, we have taken on some huge projects/changes, we have been learning exponentially and I get huge satisfaction from my role. It’s not hard to see why it has been so hard to walk away, to switch off and to have enough energy and enthusiasm for other areas of life.

Together, we have had an incredible year of achievement. 2017 saw a lot of firsts/big changes. We:

  1. ran our first Returnship program and hired 4 awesome senior women into our firm.
  2. designed a framework to assess new products, services and business lines, used it to approve a new pipeline of ideas.
  3. developed a 5 year business plan and outlined the KPIs for the whole firm to align their objectives to.
  4. kicked off a process to seek a long term strategic investor for the business.
  5. designed an amazing new office space and moved into 1 Angel Court.
  6. developed and launched a new brand and website.
  7. strengthened all our corporate functions, with awesome new hires that have enriched our culture.
  8. started experimenting with self-management, empowering employees to take ownership for making the firm better.
  9. prepared for and conducted our first hearing with the Competition Markets Authority.
  10. invested significantly in our technology and innovation.
  11. A few other exciting things that I can’t disclose yet!

I couldn’t understand how I finished the year feeling deflated, given how much we had achieved collectively. My colleagues were also concerned about why I was feeling this way – it was no reflection on them. I am very grateful for the amazing team of people around me, with both character and capability, which is rare to find and to be cherished.

It was only upon reflection that I realised that my disappointment was in myself, that despite all our successes, I had failed against my own goals and promises to myself and my family this year.

I knew going into the year that it was going to be a busy year ahead, but I was wary of the oft’ used narrative – “It’s just this week, this month, this project, this year… then I’ll get my life into balance…” – especially when we start new jobs, roles and projects. I’ve seen so many of my colleagues and friends struggle with this too.

Despite knowing what to do, I simply hadn’t done enough of it! I knew that “we are tempted to invest our resources in things that offer more immediate rewards and feedback like work, and that family and friends rarely shout the loudest for our attention. It will always be tempting to defer health, family and friendships, because you are busy with your career right now, but you have to invest in these long before you need them”.

Evidently it is not enough to know this, or to write it down, without cultivating the habits and making the difficult tradeoffs.

Brightspots

Whilst there were too many days when I worked for too many hours, and I was too often engrossed or exhausted to offer much creativity to other spheres of life, there were some real glimmers of hope. I find it useful to look at some of the brightspots and study them so that I can try and replicate those in 2018:

  • I had gone into 2017, knowing that I needed to carve out enough headspace, time and attention to make sure I could organise a 40th birthday celebration for my wife, the love of my life, something she’d never forget. Knowing this and scheduling it in advance meant that I was able to do this properly. This is important lesson for the future.
  • On the days when my wife/kids called me at 6pm to come home for dinner, more often than not, it was a great trigger to walk out and go home (even if there was work to finish off later at night).
  • Setting aside a day for thinking time (say each Friday, or every other week), even if it wasn’t always possible, gave me the chance to get tasks completed, think deeply, or prepare for the following week so I wouldn’t have to work over into the weekend.
  • Blocking time at the start of the day – a couple of times a week – for the gym, exercise or just thinking was really useful, otherwise I’d have meetings start from 7.15am. Managing my calendar in advance and every night, is key to communicating to my colleagues when I am and am not available.
  • Keeping a journal, the Self-Journal in particular (which I first discovered in Jan 2016), was really helpful. I wished I’d kept the discipline of it all year. It forces me to be grateful each day, to think about what the most important thing I am trying to get done, what I have learnt from the day, amongst other things.
  • Pre-booking scheduled holidays, provided quality time to read, reflect and recharge. I needed to book these regularly throughout next year.

There were some surprises that completely threw me, like my Dad’s diagnosis and subsequent operation. I was really grateful to be able to take time out from work, at short notice, to be with him for his appointments and to be by his side through this difficult process. I feel blessed that he recovered fully and our relationship is better than ever. When life throws curve balls at you, no matter how busy you are, you can and must make time.

One of the biggest changes of the year was that I fell ill and have since become intolerant to lactose, gluten and caffeine. Whilst this might not sound like a big deal, I am a real foodie, I love cheese, bread, flat whites, cakes, etc. Whilst this started off as an obstacle and curse, it has since turned into a blessing. It’s challenged some of my deepest held habits and addictions, and has shown me just how adaptable we are as human beings.

Making sense of it all

Now the four burners theory states (https://jamesclear.com/four-burners-theory) that:

“…life is filled with tradeoffs. If you want to excel in your work and in your marriage, then your friends and your health may have to suffer. If you want to be healthy and succeed as a parent, then you might be forced to dial back your career ambitions. If you divide your time equally among all four burners, you may have to accept that you will never reach your full potential in any given area.”

I’m not sure I fully agree with this view. However, it suggests that we have to live life in chapters, or seasons. For long periods of our life we have to focus on one or at the most two areas of life, if we really want to be successful in them. The challenge I have with this is seeing too many people sacrifice health, family, friendships, and other things for too long, burning those bridges and never really knowing how to go back. I also don’t believe that just giving more time to something makes you more successful at it.

I want to do this job, this role and pursue this mission for the long run, so I am determined to find a way of doing it sustainably for myself and those around me.

I still believe that making “deliberate choices each day, planning, scheduling, blocking out time, setting boundaries, managing distractions, compartmentalising, reviewing priorities daily/weekly, having an honest dialogue and creating a support network” should allow us to excel in each area of life. Maybe some days or weeks we focus on one area of another, but daily journaling, regular reflection and people to hold us accountable should stop us from getting carried away.

Looking forward to 2018

2018 is a big year: This year l turn 40. My wife and I will be celebrating 20 years of marriage. My eldest daughter becomes a teenager (between our 3 kids, we have a decade of teenager hell or heaven to look forward to depending on our mindset, how we prepare for it and approach it).

These are really significant milestones in life that I don’t want to pass me by, in the dizzying blur of work (as meaningful and satisfying as it is).

I want to begin the year with scheduled time to reflect, think, look back, plan forward, deepen relationships, be grateful and celebrate. I want to make sure my colleagues can do the same.

2018 has to be the year of recognising my strengths and weaknesses, asking for help, inviting others in, making my principles explicit and developing many other leaders around me.

My first step is going to be to write down and share my guiding principles (feeling inspired from reading Ray Dalio’s Principles).

Thank you to everyone who has supported me, pushed me and been patient with me this year – especially my wife, family, friends and colleagues.

Wishing you and yours the very best for 2018.

Are you ready to Dare Greatly?

Daring greatly leadership poster
I’ve been wanting to read this book for ages, ever since I watched Brené’s TED talk (link). I’ve been experimenting with vulnerability, something I have always found difficult, for a couple of years now (Time to get personal – 2016). This book is the gospel on vulnerability, shame and courage. It is really easy to read and is structured with checklists and summaries throughout.
I thought it would be helpful to summarise some of my big takeaways – though I encourage you to read this book and apply its lessons yourself.
Vulnerability is:
  • asking for help
  • saying no
  • starting a business
  • encouraging my kids to try (even if they might fail)
  • calling someone who lost a loved one
  • publishing your work, sending it out, etc
  • falling in love
  • trying something new
  • admitting I don’t know
  • admitting I’m afraid
  • trying again after failing
  • standing up to peer pressure
She has 10 questions she asks to understand the culture of any group or organisation:
  1. What behaviours are rewarded and punished?
  2. Where and how do people spend time, money and attention?
  3. What rules and expectations are followed, enforced and ignored?
  4. Do people feel safe and supported taking about how they feel and asking for what they need?
  5. What are the sacred cows?
  6. What stories are legend and what values do they convey?
  7. What happens when someone fails, disappoints or makes a mistake?
  8. How is vulnerability perceived?
  9. How prevalent are shame and blame and how do they show up?
  10. What’s the collective tolerance for discomfort? Is the discomfort of learning,  trying new things, giving and receiving feedback normalised or is there a premium on comfort?
The space between our practiced values and our aspirational values is the values gap. This is where we can lose people.
In an organisational culture where respect and dignity of individuals are held as the highest values, shame and blame don’t work as management styles. We can’t control the behaviour of individuals, we can only create cultures where certain behaviours are not tolerated and people are held accountable for protecting what matters most – human beings. There is no leading by fear, if we are looking for creativity, innovation and engaged learning.
A daring greatly culture is one of honest, constructive and engaged feedback. However, in most teams and organisations effective feedback is rare. There are two main reasons:
  1. we are not comfortable with hard conversations
  2. we don’t know how to give feedback in a way that moves people forward.
There’s a big difference between mean spirited criticism and constructive feedback: When we stop caring about what people think, we lose our capacity for connection, but when we become defined by what people think, we lose our willingness to be vulnerable. If we dismiss criticism we lose out on important feedback, but if we subject ourselves to hatefulness, our spirits get crushed.
Vulnerability is at the heart of the feedback process. She has a great checklist for preparing to give feedback.
I know I am ready to give feedback when:
  • I’m ready to sit next to you rather than opposite you, and put the problem in front of us rather than between us.
  • I’m ready to listen, ask questions and accept that I may not fully understand the issue.
  • I want to acknowledge what you do well instead of picking apart your mistakes.
  • I recognise your strengths and how you can use them to address your challenges.
  • I can hold you accountable without shaming or blaming you.
  • I’m willing to own my part.
  • I can genuinely thank you for your efforts rather than criticise you for your failings.
  • I can talk about how resolving these challenges will lead to your growth and opportunity.
  • I can model the vulnerability and openness that I expect to see from you.

We can tell a lot about how we are engaging with Vulnerability by observing how often we say:

  • I don’t know
  • I need help
  • I’d like to give it a shot
  • I disagree – can we talk about it
  • I did it
  • Here’s how I feel
  • I’d like some feedback
  • Can I get your take on this?
  • What can I do better next time?
  • Can you teach me how to do this?
  • I take responsibility for that
  • I’m here for you
  • I want to help
  • Let’s move on
  • I’m sorry
  • This means a lot to me
  • Thank you
My commitment as a leader:
  1. I want you to show up, to be yourself, to be open to learning.
  2. I want you to take risks, embrace your vulnerabilities and be courageous.
  3. I commit to engaging with you, standing beside you and learning from you.
  4. I commit to be vulnerable, to be courageous and to dare greatly.
“The key to our transformation as leaders is in realising that getting people to engage or take ownership isn’t about the telling but about letting them come to their own idea in a purpose-led way, and our job is to create the space for others to perform. This is a shift from “having the best idea” or “solving all the problems” to “being the best leader of people”.
This is a shift from controlling to engaging with vulnerability – taking risks and cultivating trust.”
– Christine Day, CEO Lululemon
Vulnerability is the birthplace of creativity, innovation and trust. If you want your employees that take responsibility, take risks and have an entrepreneurial spirit, you have to encourage people to try and to make mistakes (and be willing to stand by them when they do).
Go read it and apply her lessons for yourself!
(Brené has a great chapter on “wholehearted parenting” that is builds on these ideas powerfully.)

How to stop your CEO (or boss) from screwing up!

More than a year ago, April 2016, I set out to study leadership, by experimenting, journaling and reflecting on my own journey as the new CEO for Redington.

124H

I’ve tried to look back on the past year dispassionately to learn clear lessons that can frame the next year. I have tried to think about what has mattered the most, what to maintain, what to let go of and what changes to make. This has actually been really hard to do objectively, given how self-preserving our memories can be, forgetting mistakes, making us blind to so much and especially the many people who play a huge part, the conditions and even luck.

I found it really helpful to look back at my journal and blogs throughout the year:

Reflections on Leadership 1 year in

Management, as we know it, was invented 100 years ago to get people to show up to work, to do the same thing efficiently, every day and in the same way. It was not designed to engage, adapt and innovate. Yet the world, our work and industries have changed beyond recognition.  We need an overhaul of our management systems, tools and thinking to ensure they are fit for purpose.  I believe we need to reinvent leadership.

Patrick Lencioni wrote about the 5 Temptations of a CEO. Here are some related reflections on my first year in the role:

1. When you’re a new leader (frankly new in any role) there is a natural desire to prove yourself, to show that your recruiters/backers made a good decision. As a leader stepping into this role, I knew and trusted my own abilities. It was natural to make plans based on what I knew I could do, without a deep understanding of other people’s skills, ambitions and capacity. I did not ask for help enough and didn’t seek advice often enough. I tried to do too many things myself. This can only ever succeed in the short term. If you’re not careful this can lead to bottlenecks, resentment, over-dependence and abdication of responsibility from those around you. I’ve had to reframe and hack my own tendency to ensure I ask for help from my team, from the wider employees, from the Board of Directors and other CEOs.

2. Everyone looks to their leaders for certainty. Everyone tells you to project confidence in front of your staff. I think this is dangerous. My goal is to develop a firm of leaders at Redington. As a result I have tried to experiment with being vulnerable, acknowledging my mistakes, as well as inviting critical thinking and challenge. It’s been difficult (it’s not at all natural for me) but really insightful. I have found that talented people really value openness, transparency and clarity much more than leaders projecting false certainty and offering blind assurances.

3. As a leader you enter a different echo-chamber in which it becomes increasingly difficult to put yourself in the shows of your front line staff or your clients. Dan Pink says there is an inverse correlation between status and empathy. Leaders find it harder to empathise and see things through the eyes of others. I was aware of this coming into the role, so my experiment to counter this has been to regularly schedule honest and open conversations with clients, staff and suppliers to invite their constructive feedback and to see the firm through their eyes. Even if you schedule regular chats, people often struggle to give you the constructive challenge you desperately need. I need to periodically push myself out of the business to spend time in different environments, with different people and experiences.

4. Popularity is very seductive. It’s very tempting to want to be everyone’s friend. So often leaders struggle to have difficult conversations, to hold people accountable and call out the elephants in the room. Too often leaders choose to maintain harmony in the team and avoid confrontation. It’s natural to want everyone to get on, even though you know there is value in debate, challenge and constructive conflict. This has been difficult for me historically. I have deliberately worked on this all year. I have been running training sessions (using the AltMBA learning format) for all my direct reports and other team leaders on “radical candour”. We have been able to create a common language, permission and shared practice. Whilst radical candour is starting to creep into the language of the firm, it will take a lot more practice and trust for people to apply effectively across the firm (without abusing it).

5. Success is dangerous. It leads to complacency. The more that things go well, the more you start to believe your own hype. Even if you start off with a risk taking, failure embracing, growth mindset, success has the power to shift you to being fixed and risk averse, without even realising it. Every win, every successful project, every initiative landed sows the seeds of complacency, gradually eroding your growth mindset. In addition, what took me a bit by surprise is that people assume you know what your are doing because you’re CEO; success just reinforces that. The dopamine hit means you do more things that give you more status (without even realising), rather than focusing on the choices that will deliver the best results. I have to keep catching myself, asking my team and the wider firm to challenge me, to point out “what I am missing” or “what should I think about differently”. I’ve found this particularly hard, but it is the key to consistently delivering results.

I have shared these and many more reflections with my team and the firm over the past few months. On my one year anniversary I invited blisteringly honest feedback from across the firm and in response to it have tried to set up our governance, communication and decision-making differently for this next year, to learn from those lessons, setting up new experiments to deliver different outcomes.

Leadership 2.0

Having started my second year in the role, I’ve been thinking about setting out some red flags and warning signs to the whole firm, so they can keep me (as well as the other leaders in the firm) accountable. This was inspired by fund manager research process where we identify what could go wrong with a fund manager in advance using “RedRadar”. We share this with clients that are investing in any fund from the outset, so they can anticipate, be alert and prepared if something starts to go wrong.

Much like Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), these are 7 Key Risk Indicators (KRIs) for me and frankly any CEO or leader:

  1. Infallible: if your CEO or manager is not making any mistakes, they are not taking enough risk, maybe previous successes have created complacency.
  2. Unchallenged: If people stop asking the CEO/leaders questions, stop challenging them, start accepting whatever them say, this is a red flag.
  3. Frantic: If they are always running around, from meeting to meeting, neglecting rest, learning and reflection, complaining about not enough time to do the important things.
  4. Defensive: If they are defensive when you challenge or criticise their decisions, this is a worrying.
  5. Agreeable: If they start to avoid people, do not facilitate conflict, do not offer radical candour this is a concern.
  6. Indecisive: If you are always waiting on them to make decisions, so that you can move forward. If every decision goes through them, this is a warning sign.
  7. Controlling: If your CEO/leader does not invest in others, does not develop leaders around them, this is a problem. I think a good leader is always looking to make themselves redundant.

I find these are really helpful checks and balances for myself.

I know for example, I am struggling with feeling a bit frantic (#3) at the moment and am doing something about it. This was my overarching focus (new year’s resolution) for 2017, to experiment with daily hacks, habits, systems, routines and overrides to give time and attention to my family, my health and all the things at work and outside of work that are most important in the long term. It has been a daily battle, a weekly struggle and an ongoing war against my own mind, against the urgent, the loud and the easy. I am still trying to make deliberate choices, planning, scheduling, blocking out time, setting boundaries, managing distractions and creating a support network. Some days I win and some I lose, but its a daily battle worth fighting.

An invitation to challenge authority

Back to the overarching theme of this blog, I believe that everyone has a responsibility to hold their leaders accountable, to challenge them, to call them out if they show one of these warning signs and to help them succeed by not screwing up.

Of the various factors that have been tested by psychologists for what makes great teams, the one that stands out above all is ‘psychological safety’ – a shared belief held by the members of a team, that the group is a safe place to take risks and challenge authority.

Amy Edmondson wrote in 1996 in The Journal of Applied Behavioural Science, that “the best team leaders encourage people to speak up; teammates felt like they can expose their vulnerabilities to each other; people could suggest ideas without fear of retribution; the culture discourages people from making harsh judgements.” My ongoing fundamental cultural challenge remains – How do we help people to feel safe, whilst encouraging them to disagree? – I’m sure this is true for most other leaders too.

It has been an incredible year of experimentation, achievement and learning. It’s been a great start to the second year. I feel privileged to serve the people in the firm, to be part of this tribe and to have shareholders who want to make 100m people financially secure.

“We don’t hire smart people so we can tell them what to do, we expect them to tell us what to do.”

References:

Be the change: Reflections on 100 days as CEO

Friday marked 100 days since I took on this role as CEO of Redington – “the best job in the industry” – as one of our clients put it.

They say that during his first 100 days in office, President Franklin D. Roosevelt “sent 15 messages to Congress, guided 15 major laws to enactment, delivered 10 speeches, held press conferences and cabinet meetings twice a week, conducted talks with foreign heads of state, sponsored an international conference, made all the major decisions in domestic and foreign policy, and never displayed fright or panic and rarely even bad temper.”
– Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Age of Roosevelt

I didn’t have a specific 100 day plan and I’m not sure 100 days is quite as valuable a period for assessment as the hype suggests.

Fortunately, I’m not in Roosevelt’s shoes, though, I did feel these were big shoes to fill. The job description I proposed for the Redington CEO, 10 years after the company was founded by entrepreneurs like Robert Gardner and Dawid Konotey-Ahulu, was to grow the culture, capability and infrastructure to move us closer to our ultimate goal of making 100 million people financially secure.

We currently help just over 1 million people achieve greater financial security primarily through our Defined Benefit pensions business. Against the backdrop of pension fund disasters, our clients continue to perform well. They manage their funds with discipline. Rather than spending lots of time forecasting the future, our clients work hard to ensure they are more resilient, whatever happens.

We regularly ask ourselves: what client problems we can solve better; what unmet or un-articulated needs could we fulfil; what legacy methods or systems should be challenged? The next 10 years could see us enter new geographies, start new business lines and/or adopt new technologies. Above all, we will need to test new ideas, empathise, innovate and take risks. This is Redington’s ‘game’.

Rob and Dawid have been clear about their longer term ambitions ‘game’ too. So far though, I have not talked much about my dream or mission. It’s always a bit scary sharing your dream, it makes you vulnerable and open to criticism. Being more vulnerable was my New Years resolution, so here goes…

Continue reading Be the change: Reflections on 100 days as CEO

Taking responsibility (for myself)

It’s been a month already! The curve is still steep and the learning is relentless. I’m still loving it, with all its ups and downs. A great question to ask yourself is: What is a game worth playing –  win, lose or draw? (Source: Mike Harris).  For me the opportunity to scale Redington’s culture is a pretty awesome one. I continue to feel very grateful for this role and the incredible people I have around me.

http://gratisography.com/

Continue reading Taking responsibility (for myself)

Reflections on talent, culture, leadership and engagement (Strategic HR Magazine)

At a recent conference, I found myself sitting next to the founder of a rapidly growing media company. She was talking to me about the challenges of hiring and retaining graduates. “What is it with millennials?” She said. “They are so impatient, some haven’t even been working for a year and they want to be promoted. In my day, you just put your head down and did your time.”

Continue reading Reflections on talent, culture, leadership and engagement (Strategic HR Magazine)

2016 – Time to get personal

shutterstock_259247516

As 2015 ends and a new year begins, I wanted to reflect on the past few years and plan for the coming year. I was helped by the fact that I had written a New Year’s blog at the start of each year:

  • 2013 was a year of ‘discovery’ – starting a new chapter in my career, developing new skills, facing fears and being bold (Become the hero of your own story!). My big lesson was focus.
  • 2014 was the year of ‘devotion’ (What will you devote yourself to this year?) – My focus was on figuring out what I was going to devote my time, enthusiasm and energy to? I learnt lots of lessons and I found my tribe at Redington.
  • 2015 started as a year of ‘sacrifice’, surrender and pilgrimage for my wife and I. Over the year it developed in directions that I could not have even imagined. I learnt more, wrote more and delivered more than I ever thought possible (15 top tips for a successful 2015).

In 2015, I handed on my youth development responsibilities to a new generation of leaders (after nearly a decade), completed the AltMBA, met the Dalai Lama and Seth Godin, launched Hindu Heroes with my children & friends and contributed to some really cool projects at work…(it’s funny how we never remember our failures and mistakes when we look back – more on that later…).

So what’s my resolution for 2016?

It’s not business, it’s personal…

In 2015, the biggest lesson I learnt is that business is about people (sounds obvious but we seem to have lost the ‘personal’ in pursuit of the ‘professional’).

I was reminded that leadership is about people, marketing is about people and in fact everything is about people. Organisations are just communities of people. People with ambitions. People with hangups and insecurities. People with dreams. People with feelings.

Companies don’t have values or ethics, people have values and ethics. As Seth Godin points out “Corporations are collections of people. Business is too powerful for us to leave our humanity at the door of the office. It’s not business, it’s personal.”

Innovation from the heart

Our corporate jargon like strategy, vision and innovation also miss the mark when they omit the critical human element. There’s nothing wrong with these words, but they’re not the ones that inspire human hearts.

In the words of Gary Hamel “Innovation starts with the heart—with a passion for improving the lives of those around you.” Without tapping into individual passions you just have an ideas box. Empathy is the engine of innovation.

That’s why we should worry about just how de-humanized our organisations have become. If you want to innovate, you need to be inspired, your colleagues need to be inspired, and ultimately, your customers need to be inspired.

“The best innovations—both socially and economically—come from the pursuit of ideals that are noble and timeless: joy, wisdom, beauty, truth, equality, community, sustainability and love. These are the things we live for, and the innovations that really make a difference are the ones that are life-enhancing. And that’s why the heart of innovation is a desire to re-enchant the world.” – Gary Hamel

Understanding people

The more we understand people the more likely it is that we will do great work: from the people we are managing, to the people we are serving; from the people who supply us, to the people who we are persuading.

People are not always rational, people are not one-dimensional, people are not just a number and people are certainly not all the same. We need to understand each person, each tribe and each group, in order to engage, influence, change, manage or inspire.

We need to seek to understand peoples’ dreams and goals, their worldviews, their boundaries and constraints, their assets and the voice in their heads.  This has to be the starting point if we want to tell stories that will grab attention, resonate and mobilise.

Aligning ambitions

Last year, more than ever before, I learnt how valuable it was to spend time understanding and aligning people’s personal ambitions, needs and agendas.

I learnt that success is not from persuading everyone around the table about your point of view but inviting each person to shape, mould and contribute. After all, regardless of how good your idea is, its only worth anything if implemented or executed. It will only be adopted, if people have had a chance to contribute or if helps them achieve their personal ambitions.

The long and short of it is – the more we are willing to change ourselves, the more we are willing to listen and understand … the more we can build and work in highly effective teams.

Leadership

Business is personal. Leadership is personal.

“I think that leadership is in deep, serious, and historic trouble today. I think that leadership needs radical reinvention — and further, that reimagining it is going to require coming squarely to terms with its failures and shortcomings.” – Umair Haq

At Sandhurst Military college they teach all the officers that – “We serve to lead.”. Personally, I think we lead to serve… the words of Clay Christensen really resonate with me “management is one of the most noble professions, if it is practiced well. No other occupation offers as many ways to help others learn and grow…”. 

I’ve learnt more about ‘selfless service’ from my wife than anyone else. To really lead others we have to start by leading ourselves. We need to cultivate our inner qualities of empathy, forgiveness, compassion, rebellion, perseverance, purpose, imagination and passion .

It seems that the more human we are, the more fallible we are, the more vulnerable we are … the more people can relate to us … the more we can understand and engage the humanity in others.

At the start of 2015 I shared 15 lessons/tips for the year. As I start 2016 I just have one…

Resolution

In 2016 I want to lead, to serve and, above all, to make it personal.

In order to do that properly, I need to be more vulnerable. I need to share my thinking, my processes and, most importantly, my mistakes.

Our mistakes are far more valuable for helping those around us feel secure, take risks, deal with failure, learn, grow and be inspired.

Vulnerability is a leader’s greatest asset.

Happy New Year everyone!

Please share your lessons and resolutions too…