Tag Archives: change

Be the change: Reflections on 100 days as CEO

Friday marked 100 days since I took on this role as CEO of Redington – “the best job in the industry” – as one of our clients put it.

They say that during his first 100 days in office, President Franklin D. Roosevelt “sent 15 messages to Congress, guided 15 major laws to enactment, delivered 10 speeches, held press conferences and cabinet meetings twice a week, conducted talks with foreign heads of state, sponsored an international conference, made all the major decisions in domestic and foreign policy, and never displayed fright or panic and rarely even bad temper.”
– Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Age of Roosevelt

I didn’t have a specific 100 day plan and I’m not sure 100 days is quite as valuable a period for assessment as the hype suggests.

Fortunately, I’m not in Roosevelt’s shoes, though, I did feel these were big shoes to fill. The job description I proposed for the Redington CEO, 10 years after the company was founded by entrepreneurs like Robert Gardner and Dawid Konotey-Ahulu, was to grow the culture, capability and infrastructure to move us closer to our ultimate goal of making 100 million people financially secure.

We currently help just over 1 million people achieve greater financial security primarily through our Defined Benefit pensions business. Against the backdrop of pension fund disasters, our clients continue to perform well. They manage their funds with discipline. Rather than spending lots of time forecasting the future, our clients work hard to ensure they are more resilient, whatever happens.

We regularly ask ourselves: what client problems we can solve better; what unmet or un-articulated needs could we fulfil; what legacy methods or systems should be challenged? The next 10 years could see us enter new geographies, start new business lines and/or adopt new technologies. Above all, we will need to test new ideas, empathise, innovate and take risks. This is Redington’s ‘game’.

Rob and Dawid have been clear about their longer term ambitions ‘game’ too. So far though, I have not talked much about my dream or mission. It’s always a bit scary sharing your dream, it makes you vulnerable and open to criticism. Being more vulnerable was my New Years resolution, so here goes…

Continue reading Be the change: Reflections on 100 days as CEO

AltMBA: Reinventing the MBA

It all began just 4  weeks ago when I received this email from Seth Godin’s blog (http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2015/05/a-different-way-to-move-forward.html).

Seth has been often quoted saying:

The traditional top-tier MBA takes two years, you usually need to move and it costs more than $125,000. The best business school experience is transformative. It exposes students to a new way of thinking as well as a cohort of fellow travelers, motivated, smart people in a hurry to change things. What’s changed is that access to information is no longer the reason to go to business school. The information is everywhere. Our goal with the altMBA is to assemble leaders (corporate executives, non-profit linchpins, founders, managers and people in a hurry) and to connect them and amplify their work. Without leaving home. In just a month of intense effort. Instead, we’re organized around action, around publishing, around sharing your work and learning from it.

Alt MBA 2

In his blog on 12th May 2015 he announced that he is finally launching the inaugural class of altMBA. It was going to be a real-time, month-long intensive program. This was going to be a small-group process that works online as well as through hands-on projects. The focus of the program was going to be on group work, leveraging the power of collaboration, both by learning from and teaching others.

As soon as I read it I knew I had to apply. I consulted my wife, my friends, my team and my bosses to check I wasn’t being impulsive; but all were supportive. Redington encouraged me to use my current strategic projects for the assignments (as appropriate) and to do the course at work and around my work.

So I applied. It was a very different type of application form and there was a video bio to record too (my first!). 100 people were chosen for the inaugural group beginning in June. I got in. I felt excited, daunted and terrified all at the same time.

Now that it’s really happening, there is a lot of planning and scheduling to do:

  • I will find out tomorrow (on Sunday) from my coach Paul Jun who my learning group of 4 is for the first week.
  • On Monday at 11am (6am EST) I get a prompt with the first 3 projects for week 1.
  • On Tuesday and Thursday I have online study meetings with my learning team from 6pm – 9pm. Sunday we are booked for the all day.
  • We need to submit each project by midnight on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. These are all online and public.
  • We review other people’s projects and give feedback by 6pm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
  • Saturday appears to be the only day off.
  • That repeats again next week and the week after … Until the 13th assignment is handed in on 15th July.

Last week I got a box in the post at work, filled with books. I also received a reading list by email with over 70 books/blogs/articles on it … I am in heaven!

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These are the commitments we have all signed up to:

  • I will do the hard part first.
  • I will embrace emotional labor.
  • I will think of myself as the type of person who can and does.
  • And I will act that way.
  • I will have a posture of generosity. Giving without hope of getting.
  • I will care about people and the world around me…
  • And I will act that way.
  • I will dance with fear.
  • I promise I will continue to keep making change (‘ruckus’).
  • And then I’ll teach someone else to do so, too.

This is a course of the future, for the future. We are using a whole bunch of online tools, many of which I have never used before – Disqus, Zoom, Slack, Feedly, Digg, etc. Other than what I’ve described above we have no idea what to expect, what the assignments are, how exactly we will work together, how exactly we will do them …

This is not for everyone. These first 100 appear to be a diverse and interesting group of people. As it gets closer many people on the course are feeling anxious, frustrated and stressed at the sheer uncertainty. I also feel like that at some level though the experience has made me realise that I am ok with uncertainty, I can handle change and I quite like being thrown in the deep end. This process is about feeling your fears, acknowledging them and facing them. It’s early days though, I’ll keep you posted on our adventures.

Here we go: 4 weeks, 5 coaches, 13 projects, 100 people, 175 concepts.

All our work is public and will be available for review and comment here – https://altmba.com/blog/

My work will be shared here – https://altmba.com/student/miteshsheth/

Wish me luck! See you in a month.

The Inaugural Class of AltMBA 2015 runs till 15th July.

When to fire your fund manager

I spoke about “Knowing when to fire (& when to retain) your fund manager” at Fund Manager Selection 2014 this week.

Here’s a link to the Prezi.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this.

What are the most important red flags for you? Are there other early warning signals you look for?

Outcomes revolution in investment management & pharmaceuticals

IMG_0744In this month’s issue of IPE Mitesh Sheth outlines what investment managers can learn from the transformation taking place in the pharmaceutical industry.

03 June 2013

I was recently invited by Sanofi, the fourth largest healthcare company in the world by prescription sales, to talk to 500 of their UK and Irish employees about my experiences with innovation in the investment management industry. As I prepared for the presentation, talked to Sanofi’s leadership team and participated in their workshops, I came to realise the massive parallels between the pharmaceutical and fund management industries. Both industries are in the middle of an outcomes revolution.

Investment outcomes in investment management

I was first drawn to investment management, having been a pension fund consultant and manager researcher at Towers Watson in 2005. I joined David Jacob, head of fixed income at Henderson, determined to design better investment products and solutions for institutional clients. I felt strongly that clients shouldn’t care about index benchmarks, narrow asset class definitions, regional boundaries and deceptive strategy labels (like hedge funds) in achieving their overall investment outcomes – be that income, capital preservation, beating inflation, long-term growth, and so on.

We built a risk budgeting and capital-allocating ‘investment strategy group’ at the centre of the investment process. This allowed us to engage with our clients (and their ultimate clients) around their goals, risk appetite and time horizon in designing and delivering investment outcomes. With a focus on outcomes, we brought together high yield and investment grade analysis, developed market and emerging market analysis, as well as cash bonds and derivatives expertise to give clients access to the fixed income universe against their choice of benchmarks and targets.

I still believe clients should begin with the end in mind. Our starting point should be: where am I today; where do I want to get to and by when; how much risk am I willing to take (what return volatility would be uncomfortable and what’s my maximum drawdown); and what cash flow (or liquidity) do I need along the way. This is true for a pension fund, an individual investor, a family office, a sovereign wealth fund – in short, anyone.

Background to the pharmaceutical industry

The pharmaceutical industry has changed a lot over the past few decades but at its core it still develops, produces, markets and distributes drugs licensed as medicines. Drug discovery and development is very expensive as only a fraction of all compounds investigated are ever approved for human use. To cover these costs a company needs to discover a new blockbuster drug (one which generates revenues in the billions) every few years.

The industry has been growing at a rapid rate since the 1970s, as legislation allowing for stronger patents has come into force in most countries, helping pharmaceutical companies to generate significant profits from their patented products. In recent decades, a handful of large companies have dominated manufacturing of medicine around the world, supported by numerous mergers and acquisitions.

Pharmaceutical companies have been great cash generators for shareholders over the past 20 years, and IMS Health values the global pharmaceutical industry at over $800bn (€620bn). But while healthcare ought to be simple at its core, layers of management regulation, processes, policies, business models and acquisitions have complicated pharmaceutical organisations and the healthcare industry over the years – creating a global problem today that itself appears to defy definition.

Drivers of change

The market capitalisation of the largest pharma companies is expected to come under significant pressure in the coming decade. Over the next few years patent protection on historical blockbuster drugs will continue to run off. Regulators are demanding more affordable and cost-effective therapies. In addition, there is an industry-wide research-and-development pipeline gap meaning there are no big blockbusters on the horizon.

Furthermore, there is a growing demand for personalised healthcare challenging the current business model, with new competitors with new business models emerging and gaining in strength.

To add to its woes, the industry’s image has been damaged by accusations of disease mongering, bribing doctors, false claims and illegal marketing, not to mention the high profile court cases. Bestselling books such as Bad Pharma (2012), Side Effects (2008) and Big Pharma (2006) have built on the public’s impression of big businesses putting profits over patient welfare. Even Hollywood portrays pharma as a global, shadowy force (not unlike the way in which the investment industry is portrayed).

The industry has survived a continuous series of regulatory, scientific, social and political challenges in the past. However, the changes it faces today from regulation, competition, commoditisation, technological advances, austerity and public perception are significant on their own and even more disruptive when considered together, demanding a more radical response.

Parallels with fund management

These forces of change are very similar to those facing the fund management industry (global assets under management are estimated by IPE to be around €39.2trn):

• Historical blockbuster products are being commoditised;

• Intense competition is putting pressure on margins;

• Disillusioned clients and customers are frustrated with fund manager self-interest;

• Regulators are ever more intrusive, demanding more transparent charging, better management of conflicts and clearer marketing;

• Technological development is spawning new products, new business models and new avenues for client communication;

• Economic austerity, low growth and on-going cost cutting mean clients and end-customers want more for less.

Pharmaceuticals, like fund management, are B2B businesses in that the customers are essentially not the end-patients but the intermediaries – the healthcare professionals, doctors, consultants and pharmacists. These intermediaries are facing change and disruption of their own with intense regulation, flat budgets, pressure to cut costs and growing patient demands, much like the pressures on IFAs, platforms, banks, insurance companies, pensions consultants and funds.

With this roller coaster of changes and resultant uncertainty about the future, the only constant that pharmaceutical and fund management companies can hold onto is putting the end-customer (patient) at the centre. Both industries need to transform from being product centric to customer (service) centric; from pushing drugs and funds to helping customers improve their health and wealth.

Pharmaceuticals and fund management are in the midst of an ‘outcomes’ revolution. This is a huge undertaking and it cannot be achieved through a series of incremental steps or a long list of initiatives. Such fundamental changes call for a focused and radical response, leveraging one’s strengths.

Pharma’s response

Historically, large pharmaceutical companies have reacted to market pressures by cutting costs, and on the face of it this time is no different. If you look deeper though, there is a realisation among senior leaders that cost cutting is short term and incremental, and it will not address the fundamental shift they are experiencing in the competitive landscape.

They know that their entire business model needs to be looked at differently.

Sanofi (and the other major pharmaceutical companies) have recognised the need to shift from being a product marketing company to becoming a customer relationship business.

They believe that while having great products was enough to drive success in the past, this nowadays creates diminishing returns. They know that their future success will be determined not just by how many drugs are sold, but how well their products, services, tools and education have helped to improve or maintain a patients’ health and wellbeing.

Their revenues will still come from product sales, but the reason why customers will want to buy from pharmaceutical companies is changing. They need to offer their customers more for less and create an ecosystem of products and services around the end-patients’ health outcomes.

For example, in 2012 Sanofi and Agamatrix launched a new type of blood glucose monitor, which also connects to a smart phone. This allows patients to track glucose levels continuously and give them access to a telephone hotline and other support services, which earns Sanofi considerable customer loyalty. This shift to integrate products with innovative monitoring technology and personalised support services was possible because Sanofi listened to the needs of patients with diabetes.

With any change in strategy it is critical to diagnose your problems honestly and to leverage your strengths to differentiate your business. Pharma companies continue to build a stronger product portfolio through deals, partnerships, alliances and virtual R&D to access a broader universe of research companies.

However, they know not to stop here. Their sales people know their customer and they have unparalleled access and information. The best pharma companies are determined to build on this to be the partner of choice for their customers and to go beyond that in building a relationship with the end-patient too.

Pharma companies are breaking down silos (diabetes, oncology, generics, and so on) to use key account management techniques to ensure their customers do not get lots of different sales reps trying to get a share of their limited time. Instead, they are working on a single point of contact which understands the customer’s needs and offers support, education, services and products to help meet patient health outcomes. They are learning to think and care more about the customer and the patient (their needs, their experience and their long-term relationship) rather than just focusing on the disease, the drugs and their profits.

There is a significant effort being made to transform how medicines are presented, marketed and sold with a better understanding of stakeholder needs, demonstrating clear value for healthcare professionals and end patients. Sales reps are increasingly becoming a conduit of best practice among healthcare professionals, making links and introductions between stakeholders. The best are helping their customers – the intermediaries – deal with their challenges, as well as the steps, processes and tools to get to where they need to.

I am most impressed with the acknowledgement that this requires a major shift in attitude, behaviour, people and culture. Significant training of senior leaders, middle managers and other employees is underway. Employee-led customer-centric innovation is a powerful way of achieving this kind of culture change. In the past pharmaceutical innovation was limited to product development much like in fund management. Pharmaceutical companies are starting to use innovation more broadly across their employee base to improve business efficiency and customer service too. This requires giving employees permission to take risks and experiment with new ways of working without the fear of failure.

Taking a blank sheet of paper to fund management

The vast majority of investment management companies are not structured around their clients’ needs and outcomes. They are built around fund, asset class and regional silos that operate independently with limited dialogue, interaction and collaboration. A handful of houses have created successful outcome teams or divisions – with LDI or multi-asset specialists – though even there the challenge remains to apply this way of thinking to the rest of the business.

Senior leadership in investment management houses does not yet accept that the investment management business model needs to be overhauled. There is no overall drive to move the business from being product marketing to client relationship centric, and no corresponding plan to shift attitude, behaviour, people and cultures. Innovation remains a product manufacturing activity.

As an industry we need to look at the end investors and clients, rather than just being focused on the intermediaries and consultants, and start to ask ourselves how we can work together do a better job for them.

Some of the more dynamic, agile and client-centric investment managers are starting to realise this and are taking it seriously. Here are some lessons we can all learn from the disruption facing the pharmaceutical industry and their response:

  1. Our clients’ focus on outcomes will affect our whole business model not just a single multi-asset product area;
  2. A central risk-management, risk-budgeting and allocation team is essential in responding to clients’ needs and designing/delivering investment outcomes;
  3. Break down silos between funds, between equities and fixed income, between manufacturing and distribution, between back/middle office and the front office and between the corporate/board and the business to work together to deliver better outcomes for the end client;
  4. Focus on our strengths, rather than being all things to all people. Build alliances and partnerships with specialist investment boutiques and complementary players;
  5. Rebuild trust by putting the end-customer at the centre of our business. Help the clients and intermediaries deal with change and work together to deliver better solutions for the end customer;
  6. Train sales people to behave more like well-informed, trusted advisers. They must be able to listen and draw out client’s unarticulated needs. They must be able to offer advice and assistance to help our clients reach their overall strategic goals;
  7. Foster a client-centric, employee-led innovation culture beyond product manufacturing;
  8. Give our employees permission to take risk and experiment with new ways of working, without the fear of failure.

Finally, it is all too easy to stick to what we know and who we know. If the investment management industry wants to adapt, innovate, transform and engage, we need to include people with different perspectives, with different experiences and expertise; intentionally draw on customer insights, employee ideas and other industry perspectives.

I think if senior leaders in investment management commit to becoming fit for the future they will be blown away by how many middle managers, employees and clients volunteer their time, ideas and enthusiasm to solve these complex industry challenges.

If we get it right, our clients will be more successful in meeting their investment outcomes and our employees will thank us for investing in them and for helping them to do the best work of their lives.

Here’s a link to the full article here. 

Rethinking Innovation in Healthcare

I was invited by a leading global Pharmaceutical company to talk to around 500 of their UK & Irish employees about innovation today. I am blown away by the parallels between healthcare and investment management, in particular the shift from pushing products to delivering outcomes/solutions for customers (and ultimately patients). Here’s the Prezi and a summary of my key points. 

Background and context

Since leaving Henderson, I have made it my mission to help organisations in different industries enable their people to do the best work of their lives, whilst adding meaningful value to their customers, companies and society. I am convinced this is the future of work and I want to play my part in rebuilding organisations to fully utilise and honour the gifts of every single person who comes to work every day.

I believe real value is created in the gap between the employee and the customer, between manufacturing and distribution, between head office and the field. That is where innovation happens and is needed. I am talking about employee led, customer centric innovation. That’s what I mean when I say Rethink Innovation.

The need for innovation

There is a desperate need for innovation today as many companies, in many industries are facing accelerated change and disruption:

  • Historical products are being commoditized & we are facing intense competition putting pressure on margins and making it difficult to differentiate.
  • Technology is developing exponentially bringing huge advances in science, genetics, healthcare, communication, etc. dramatically changing the landscape.
  • Information itself is commoditized and customers have much more information at their fingertips making them more demanding.
  • The general public and customers are disillusioned with corporate self interest.
  • In a world of austerity and low growth customers want more for less!

These are major forces of change on their own let alone when considered together. We cannot do things the way they have always been done. We need to adapt, innovate and engage to survive. We need to redesign our companies, industries and economies for a changing world.

When I talk about employee-led or grassroots innovation, I don’t mean it in the sense you might know it. You don’t need to sign off a big budget, it doesn’t need to come from the top, it is not just about product – launching the next big blockbuster, it is not just the concern of specialists/creatives/scientists and definitely does not need to take years in development.

Innovation comes from the latin word ‘innovare’ – meaning to change. Innovation is the development of real value for customers by developing solutions to their unarticulated needs – through different products, processes, services, ideas, technologies or business models.

Employee-led innovation

Counter-intuitively innovation thrives under constraints, some of the most innovative companies are emerging in developing countries – like India. A leader in this fieldVineet NayaCEO of HCL Technologies India, has built his whole company around employee-led innovation with ‘reverse accountability’, where all employees rate their boss and their bossboss and can hold their management accountable because he believes that all value is created between the employee and the customer. It should not be surprising that technology companies lead the way in this given the internet itself is incredible adaptable, innovative and engaging.

I believe anyone can be creative and I believe that innovation is everyone’s business if our companies are going to adapt, innovate and engage. When all employees have permission to innovate with customers at the centre of everything they do – that’s where the magic happens!

Fostering innovation communities

The key to engaging staff in innovation is to bring together different people, with different perspectives in small groups to vent frustrations, share problems, challenge dogma and channel ideas. This must be supported by leaders, must be recognised and be fun/inspiring in order for people to volunteer their time, creativity and energy.

You will need to draw on different perspectives, really listen to customers and others internally and externally. It is by encouraging and empowering lots of people to deliver lots of small ideas with minimal cost/risk that momentum is created. It is critical that the leadership team continually encourage participation, remove barriers and celebrate successes.

To set up an innovation community you need to:

  • set a strategic context around critical business problems
  • educate how this new way of working will fit into/around existing work & how it will differ (with both management and employees)
  • support members with light touch coaching and adequate infrastructure
  • get going with a pilot to experiment, learn, review and deliver some quick wins
  • ensure your leadership team continuously encourage participation, celebrate successes and build legitimacy in the organisation by removing barriers
  • build alignment by integrating innovation into the organisational habits and culture

Making innovation everyone’s business

It is human nature to be myopic and to look at things from our own narrow viewpoints. However, when we look at the bigger picture, when we look beyond our boundaries, and consider different perspectives we start to see things differently. Perspective is a powerful thing. Innovation comes from changing your perspective, drawing on different perspectives and thereby thinking differently.

It is all too easy to stick to what you know and who you know, but if you do what you’ve always done, you get what you’ve always got. If you want to adapt, innovate and engage, you need to intentionally include people with different perspectives, with different experiences & expertise; intentionally draw on customer insights and other industry perspectives. Only then can you start to see what others have missed.

Fostering innovation communities gives all employees permission to do things differently, to challenge dogma, to vent frustrations, to get different perspectives, to share best practices, to have a safe space to experiment, to take risks and to fail fast, learn and adapt. Employee-led innovation is energising, refreshing, engaging and you will be blown away by how many people volunteer the gift of their time, ideas and enthusiasm to further corporate goals and complex industry challenges. If you can get it right, your employees will thank you for investing in them and for helping them to do the best work of their lives.

To read more about ‘innovation communities’ – click here.